Tag Archives: redwoods

Pictorial Highlight: Humboldt! #2

Roosevelt elk mama

Forest Reflection, Gold’s Beach, Praire Creek.

Young baby elk in April 2009.

“Na-na-nana-na, you don’t have antlers!!”

There is magic even in the tiniest of organisms; this is just the fruit, the reproductive organ, of a vast underground network of mycelium…and fungi are closer genetically to animals than they are to plants. Ponder THAT one for a minute!

Joie de Rikki, Gold’s Beach.

The sun drops below the horizon, painting the sky with its light-brush from millions of miles away, and the chill ocean breeze picks up and it lifts mist from the crest of each wave, and you feel like every moment is rife with possibility, with the awe of being alive in such a beautiful place, with the responsibility to do something that learning to love such things places on you.  You feel inspired.  The night flings itself upon you.

Sitting on a beached log, of which there are countless here…

There is something ultimately primordial about the temperate redwood rainforests of northern Humboldt and of Del Norte Counties.  Not just the size of the trees, but the density, the fecundity, the lushness; it can take you 10 minutes to travel 30 feet off-trail in these forests; you step on what looks to be solid ground, and then sink waist-deep in foliage and plant matter and rotting wood!  You expect to see Brontosauri here, munching on the leaves of old-growth redwoods, whose branches don’t even begin until about 90 feet up.  The amount of LIFE here is staggering, staggering, and 96 percent of the northwest’s old-growth forests have been logged, poisoned with herbicides and fungicides and diesel fuel (so the poisons stick–for awhile, until they eventually runoff into the local watershed), turned into lifeless deserts or genetically-modified monocrop tree plantations or moonscapes; that is “PROGRESS”–desert behind, forest in front.  That is growth for the sake of growth, the ideology of the cancer cell.  That is industrial civilization, and it must be stopped before it kills everything.

Banana slug!

Redwood textures and colors. Disproving Reagan’s adage that once you’ve seen one, you’ve seen ’em all. Each is an individual.

This is the Arco Giant, technically located in Redwood National Park; it is the 10th largest coast redwood by volume.  I see a face, complete with green hair, on the right side of the tree–see it? The bottom of this picture is about halfway up the main trunk, where it splits–redwoods are prolific in their growth of “reiterated trunks.” Basically when the top of the main trunk is damaged, it sprouts a new “trunk” that then rockets toward the sunlight. The most architecturally complex tree in the world is Illuvatar, located somewhat near this tree, with 220 (!!) reiterated trunks.

One of the most amazing books ever created (it is not just writing, but pictures and fantastically skilled drawings by the author) is Forest Giants of the Pacific Coast  by Robert Van Pelt.  Very highly recommended!

Another darling baby elk and his mother.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pictorial Highlight: Humboldt! #1

One of the most amazing places I’ve ever been, Humboldt County and its neighboring areas (Del Norte County and Trinity County) helped make me who I am today.  I feel a deep connection to those jaw-dropping redwood forests and the coastal environs that tend to accompany them.  I spent much time there in my crucial early days as a budding radical environmentalist, and the area’s majesty (and connected devastation) was extremely influential.

Usually I just let the pictures speak for themselves, with no introduction save for that like above.  But I want to remind everybody of something.  All these MARVELOUS, SPECTACULAR natural features, and the mesmerizing animals who live among them, of California that I try to convey to you–these are mere fragments of what once was.  At least 96 PERCENT of the old-growth redwoods have been logged, ravaged, clearcut, moonscaped.  96%!  Millions of acres, and it’s not “just” trees–think of all the animals killed and left homeless and resourceless through all that habitat destruction!  These are whole ecosystems of unfathomable fecundity, being wholesale holocausted.  And it’s still going on.  Can you imagine what it would’ve been like here before the conquest of the “civilized” (e.g. white Europeans) and the death-march of industrial civilization?  Here and in the rest of California, and the rest of the west, and the country, and the world?  Just something to think about.  Enjoying these places is not enough.  We have to realize what we have lost, what used to be–and what could be again if we act in accordance to principles of compassion, if we fight those battles that truly need to be fought.

A few books I’d like to recommend that are spectacular and that will educate and inspire you, and help you appreciate even more these amazing forests:  The Wild Trees by Richard Preston and From the Redwood Forest:  Ancient Trees and the Bottom Line (which features 50 pages of breathtaking photography) by Joan Dunning and pictures by Doug Thron.

Without further delay….

Roosevelt Elk.

The Stout Tree, whose “owner” wanted to cut down in the 1950s to make a dance floor on the flat stump top.

Great white egret in flight, collecting some twigs for her nest! So majestic and graceful…

Not great picture quality, but I wanted to capture the utter strangeness of this one, whom I call the CGI Tree. It looks painted, or digitally enhanced! Such strange patterns of color and texture!

Valley with some fall foliage on the eastern edge of Humboldt/western edge of Trinity County as you go into the Coast Range mountains.

Same valley–from almost the same position!–later that evening.

Butterfly chillin on the trail! ❤

Clam Beach wind-swept sand.

Rikki takes a moment to collect her thoughts =)

Gorgeous furry caterpillar in an area of wetlands.

These horses in their pasture are just too beautiful to not include. Sometimes you’ll see the Rooseveldt hanging out among the horses, both species just eating grass, minding their business.

The biggest sitka spruce I’ve ever seen, although there are ones much, MUCH larger (mainly in northwestern Washington and southeast British Columbia)

Part 2 coming next week!

Travel Theme: CURVES

Ailsa at the lovely blog Where’s My Backpack does a weekly photography theme, and whenever her theme goes well with my nature photography and my general pro-Earth/Animal(/and in this case Woman) worldview, I’m going to post a contribution of my own….

Mmmmm, curves!  What man (and woman who loves women!) doesn’t love curves?

The loving curve of a baby redwood and his mother?

Any real man, that is.  Women have curves.  Don’t feel desert-ed if you do.

Nothern Death Valley, the Eureka Valley Dunes.

You are in good company.  Women of all colors–brown, white, auburn, beige, ebony–have curves.

Turkey Tail mushrooms.

It’s nothing to be ashamed of.  Curves inspire the flamy passion of the red-blooded.

Claret cup cactus flower in the White Moutains of eastern California.

Curves inspire awe and wonder…

Sitka spruce at Praire Creek Redwood State Park.

And are things of quiet, shapely beauty.

So join me in celebrating the wonderful, natural beauty of curves!!