Tag Archives: extinction

Support for Sabotage

Posted on the WP blog of Dr. Steve Best; written by my ally in support for strategic sabotage, Usnea–someone with whom I did relief work at Common Ground in New Orleans’s 9th Ward after Hurricane Katrina in December of 2005.

Dr. Steve Best

By Usnea, Earth First! Journal,  2011

I state without fear—but with the hope of rallying our collective courage—that I support radical actions. I support tools like industrial sabotage, monkey wrenching machinery and strategic arson. The Earth’s situation is dire. If other methods are not enough, we must not allow concerns about property rights to stop us from protecting the land, sea, and air. Today, more than ever, the Earth needs our effective action using all the methods of resistance at our disposal. Radical actions and radical movements grow out of supportive cultures. Let us once again build a strong supportive base for them.

Don’t get me wrong. During the Green Scare, in which dozens of activists  were incarcerated, our movement got seriously screwed with, and we   have had some extremely hard times because of the outstanding repression   we have faced for the last six years. I want to remember…

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Cartoons About Saving Earth!

This is reposted from www.DeepGreenResistance.org ;  read about DGR– the most critical, crucial movement this world has ever seen–the movement to TRULY save the planet and its millions of species from sure destruction.  This is about REAL sustainability, not capitalist sustainability, or sustainability that allows us to continue being vastly overpopulated and overconsumptive and destructive.  Also, you can read my review of Deep Green Resitance, published in the Earth First! Journal, HERE.

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Cartoons may seem like a questionable choice of medium for conveying complex political theory, organizational strategy, and scathing critique of mainstream movements, But then, if you feel that way, you must not have read the work of Stephanie McMillan.

McMillan, a cartoonist based out of Florida in the United States, has two main cartoons. The first, Minimum Security, is a daily comic strip in the form of a long-form narrative, about a group of friends trying to stop ecocidal maniacs from destroying the Earth. The second, Code Green, began in August 2009 as a weekly editorial cartoon focused on the environmental emergency.

From the author, Stephanie McMillan:

“I’ve been thinking of quitting drawing “Code Green,” my weekly editorial cartoon about the environmental emergency. My income from paying clients has crashed; if I’m going to continue it, it needs to be supported by readers. So I’ve started a fundraising campaign.

I’m not going to be pushing this much at all. This is the only post I’m going to make about it. I’m okay with quitting this cartoon. But because some readers seemed dismayed when I talked about quitting, I didn’t feel right about ending it without giving you a chance to keep it going.”

Support Stephanie McMillan’s Code Green here: http://www.indiegogo.com/codegreen

If you like these cartoons, I highly recommend the hilarious graphic novel As the World Burns  by Derrick Jensen and Stephanie McMillan.  You can read my short blog-post review of it HERE.

Explore Your Bioregion!

Today I was feeling extremely depressed; among other reasons, both situational and neuro-chemical, my third novel, Redwood Falls, was rejected by what I and many others who’ve read the book thought would be the *PERFECT* publisher for it, Ashland Creek Press (they’re actively seeking eco-literature).  My work has been rejected hundreds of times and I’ve developed pretty thick skin, but this one really stung hard.  It truly seemed like the perfect match.  I wonder if the material was too radical for them?  It’s going to take somebody with serious chutzpah to publish Redwood Falls, as it involves tree-spiking, knocking down power lines, sabotaging railroad tracks, and bombing oil refineries–a sort of modern-day Monkey Wrench Gang, but more radical (more extreme ecological problems demand more “extreme” methods of combating the problems!), and with more of a literary bent–I’m not saying my book is better than The Monkey Wrench Gang, I’m just saying the narrator Foster is a tortured writer whose mother (a painter) will do ANYTHING she can to keep him from writing, because she is terrified he will end up an addict or a suicide, like so many other writers and creative people in general.

My apologies for the tangent; it somehow felt relevant.  So I decided that I needed a little time in nature to soothe my tormented psyche.  I took my shirt off (gotta get dat Vitamin D!), leashed up Rikki, and walked the half mile to a nice spot at the nearby Sonoma creek.  It was so very peaceful and cathartic and healing.  I sat in the calm, cool water.  I threw stikkis for Rikki.  She chewed on them, and I watched her nosh at the creek side salad bar, as she is wont to do.  There was a 20-foot blackberry bush overhanging the edge of the creek at one place; I found some of the ripe ones and ate them straight off the branch.  They were exquisitely sweet and juicy and just a tad tart.  There’s nothing like picking and eating wild berries right off the plant.  Some of them I ate straight up, some I dipped in the creek to clean off–I wonder which is better?  My mom is always worried I’ll get giardia, because I make a point of at least tasting, if not drinking, all fresh water I swim in that seems reasonably clean.  Hey, I’m a mostly-healthful-eating vegan–hence I’ve got a dynamite immune system, and the creek and river and stream water hasn’t hurt me yet!  It’s probably less dangerous than drinking most municipal tap water, given the prevalence of flouride (an INDUSTRIAL BYPRODUCT of fertilizer manufacturing) and chlorine and other pollutants.

Beautiful rock I came across in the creek.

 

My favorite part, though, was when I sat on a little boulder jutting out of the creek side and stuck my feet and shins in the water.  Dozens and dozens of minnows, beautiful, graceful little fish, came up and began nibbling on my toes and feet and legs.  It tickled a little, but felt nice, too.  It had been a couple days since I showered, so they were probably munching off bits of dead skin (Your first reaction is probably, “Gross!”  But truly, it’s a beautiful thing!)  I felt very connected to my local ecosystem in that moment, with juice from the blackberries still sweet on my tongue and the sun heating my bare flesh and my legs pleasantly cool in the water.  And that is so important.  I’ve been to National Parks and felt less connected to the place than I did to this relatively meager little locale; and yet it’s close enough for me to walk to, even with my fucked up knees.  We don’t need to travel far (and soon enough, when automobile culture “crashes,” we won’t hardly be able to!)–to have a marvelous nature experience.  Get to know your local bioregion; it may be the difference between Life and Death when our umbilical cord to industrial water and food is severed by ecological collapse.

I also picked up trash–EVERY DAY is nature clean-up day when you’re an Environ-meddler!!  I ended up with three plastic grocery bags (one of which I was able to salvage to pick up Rikki’s turds with), a big plastic garbage bag, an unidentifiable chunk of clear plastic, bottle caps, an Arrowhead plastic water bottle (think about that one for a second and you might glean one of the pathologies of civilization), an aluminum beer can, and a whole fucking folding chair, buried in about two inches of mud and rocks on the creek side–who knows how long it’s been there!  And it’s still in perfect working order, I might vinegar the shit out of that bitch and bring it home for the porch!

Doing all that made me think that, when you get right down to it, a big part of environmentalism is cleaning up the SHIT–literal and figurative–left behind by the assholes who came before us.  Whether that shit is actual shit, or nuclear waste, or pollution in the air/water/soil, that’s what it comes down to.  (If you want to learn more about what industrial humans leave behind, I highly recommend What We Leave Behind  by Jensen and McBay, and Garbage Land  by Elizabeth Royte.)

But this is the absolutely essential part, so PAY ATTENTION!:  It is not enough to merely clean up the shit left behind by humans.  Because we can never get it all!  What we have to do is ***STOP THE SHIT FROM BEING MANUFACTURED IN THE FIRST PLACE.***  In other words, if we want life on Earth to continue with any kind of diversity, we MUST hinder the smooth functioning of industrial syphilization, with the ultimate goal of dismantling it wholesale.  That’s it.  That’s the only way we’re going to stop the current Mass Extinction of plants and animals underway, caused by industrial civilization.

Rikki, NOT pleased at the prospect of a post-creek bath.

Extinction Explosion

It’s long past time to use our lives as a monkeywrench in the gears of civilization.  This is calamitous.  WAKE UP!!  www.DeepGreenResistance.org/dew

From the Earth First! Newswire blog:

Extinction Explosion.

Contraception, Vasectomies, Abortion!

Get a VasectomyOne Little Prick Now is Better Than Having a Bunch of Little Pricks Later!

Come on, fellas.  You support women’s rights?  Then stop putting the burden of birth control and possible pregnancy on them!  Get a vasectomy.  Overpopulation is one of the main things that is driving the Earth’s sixth mass extinction and killing the global biosphere.  If you want a kid, adopt.

 

 

Fighting Back–The Stonewall Riots

This post is dedicated to, and about, the brave women and men who, 43 years ago today, said Enough is enough.  Who persevered through what must’ve been terrible fear, who stood up to their oppressors and FOUGHT BACK.  They are the reason that Gay Pride Parades are held throughout the country around this time; they helped spawn the modern gay rights’ movement.  And they are a shining example of how pacifism is not always enough–it’s just a tool, like any other in the toolbox.  Sometimes we have to fight back, turn the aggressors’ violence back on them and see how they like it, with all the fierce burning rage of the abused, the oppressed and repressed.  And sometimes we have to fight in the place of those who can’t fight for themselves.

In the early morning hours of June 28th, 1969, New York Police Officers were yet again harassing the patrons of a popular Greenwich Village gay bar, the Stonewall Inn.  Raids and harassment of gay bars were a common occurrence; after all, New York actually had laws prohibiting homosexuality in public (whatever that means!)  But that gives you an idea of the repressive, “closeted” atmosphere of the times.  But this one night was different.  People were fed up.  Patrons began throwing pennies at the six officers assigned to raid the Stonewall Inn.  Someone started a fire outside, and a parking meter was dismantled to use as a battering ram against the police.  Tensions grew.  Reinforcements were called in–police, of course, but also fellow gay men and women who were sick of the atmosphere of hatred and violence against their brothers and sisters of oppression.  Chants of “GAY POWER!” erupted.

Eventually police riot squads broke up the protesters, but the next night the crowd returned, with numbers swelling to upward of 1,000.  “Very soon it was obvious to everyone that the weak, limp-wristed, helpless, pathetic, sissy boys–and NOT the police–were in control.”  (http://www.stageandcinema.com/2011/04/23/stonewall-uprising/)  They rioted and protested outside the Stonewall Inn for hours, until they were again dispersed by battalions of anti-riot goons.  In the days following, demonstrations took place all over the city.

“In the wake of the riots, intense discussions about civil rights were held among New York’s LGBT[Q] people, which led to the formation of various advocacy groups…”  (http://www.civilrights.org/archives/2009/06/449-stonewall.html )  These events inspired LGBTQ activists around the country to organize and agitate for gay rights.

The Stonewall Riots were a watershed moment in the modern LGBTQ movement.  On the one-year anniversary of those nights of rage, the first Gay Pride march was held.

Those of us in the environmental community could learn a lot from these brave warriors.  What will it take for us to have a watershed moment like this?  I still don’t think we’ve broken through that kind of barrier.  Of course the situations are different, but I’m talking commonalities here.  Most people still don’t know (or refuse to believe, or willfully forget) that civilization is causing a mass extinction of plants and animals, on the order of 10,000 species a year.  It is the first mass extinction not caused by a calamitous natural event (e.g. volcano eruption(s), asteroid impact, etc.).  Dead zones are spreading in the ocean.  Billions of animals are being tortured and maimed and massacred in industrial slaughterhouses and vivisection laboratories.  90 percent of the large fish in the ocean are gone.  Coral reefs, the biodiversity-rainforests of the ocean, are dying.  Rainforests are being razed.  How much more will it take before we begin to create our own watershed moments?  It doesn’t have to be a riot.  It just has to BE.  Has to happen.  And we can have a thousand watershed moments in a thousand different places.

It’s time to begin preparing for a Deep Green Resistance, for Decisive Ecological Warfare.  Time is running out.  Will you join me in calling for, and helping to create and enact, what must be done in order for life on Earth to continue and thrive?  Everyone can play a role.  What is yours?

Thanks to Stage and Cinema and CivilRights.org for their great information.